About Us

Twinkle Star Children’s Trust was established in 2012 following the death of our Son, Isaac. Isaac was taken from us suddenly after complications from contracting influenza, he was just 4 years old. Isaac was a care-free, loving, considerate and intelligent boy and we are very proud of him. He was bright and funny and had a passion for drawing and nature.

We take some comfort from looking back at Isaac’s short life and the realisation that he had every advantage we could possibly give him. Loving parents, sister and extended family, family holidays to Portugal and Spain, regular trips to the countryside, good local community events and schooling and perhaps most importantly our time and attention to nurture and develop his natural skills and interests.

We appreciate that many children do not have these advantages and this is why we have set up TSCT with the primary aims to support local children’s projects and enrich the lives and educational experiences of children from disadvantaged and challenging backgrounds and help those around them to devote time attention and resources which are so important to nurturing children in our community

We also take some comfort that Isaac was in good health through most of his life and did not have to live with any debilitating or life-threatening condition. He lived a care-free life of innocence which is denied to many children for many different reasons and we would like to help tackle some of those problems and enrich the lives of terminally ill children as the charity hopefully grows.

If you would like to donate…..If you want to help with fundraising or you want to run your own fundraising event, please contact us at info@twinklestarchildren.org.uk

Thank you for your support.

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The natural world held much fascination for Isaac. Apart from the obligatory dinosaurs, Isaac was instinctively a ‘tree-hugger’, literally hugging trees and saying ‘they are my friends! We believe it is crucial that children maintain a connection with the Earth and are educated on the importance of preserving the environment for their own futures. Unfortunately, a recent poll by the RSPB has shown that 4 out of 5 children do not have a connection with nature. Improving and maintaining this connection is not only important to protect the natural world but is also beneficial to children’s overall health and development. We live in a world where childhoods are increasingly commercialised and this is only serving to accentuate the issues of a disconnected youth.

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